Blog Posts in: UNH Research

Life Sciences Microscope on Bacteria Clip Art

Obtaining Patent Protection for Life Sciences Academic Research

Tuesday, November 17, 2015
Patent protection rewards an inventor with a 20-year monopoly for the public disclosure of their invention. In order to be granted a patent, an invention must meet the statutory requirements of Title 35 of the U.S. Code (35 U.S.C.), which are: patentable subject matter, adequate disclosure, usefulness, novelty, and non-obviousness. As a life scientist as well as student at UNH School of Law, I am most interested in how these statutory requirements present unique challenges to academic research, especially in the field of molecular biology (e.g. Molecular Pathology, Inc. v. Myriad Genetics,... Read More
Hands Shaking in Agreement

Commercialization? Not me!

Wednesday, March 25, 2015
One of the elements of my job that I really enjoy is presenting to UNH faculty, staff, and students about technology transfer. What is it? Why do we do it? How do we do it? Over the years, a common reaction to these questions has been: “Why do I need to care about commercialization?” “I’m not interested in it, and it’s not right for my work nor for me.” Rather than being a conversation stopper, this creates the perfect opening for a discussion about why commercialization is absolutely right for you. A few basics first and then I’ll get to “why you:” Read More
Quaterrylene Synthesizing Process

Seeking Partners to Commercialize One-Step Process for Synthesizing Quaterrylene

Thursday, January 1, 2015
Quaterrylene is an aromatic hydrocarbon (essentially a small piece of graphene) with many applications in organic photovoltaics, organic thin-film transistors, and organic light emitting diodes due to its photophysical and semiconducting properties. Despite the unique value of quaterrylene, the current availability of quaterrylene is limited. Existing methods of synthesizing quaterrylene are expensive, time consuming, and result in low yields. In addition, these methods are only suitable for small-scale reactions. Read More